Greek and Roman Architecture

CheckPoint: Greek and Roman Architecture

Greek and Roman Architecture are two of the most defined and easily recognized types of architecture there is. Greek architecture really started to be recognized during the seventh century. Originally this type of building started with the use of wood and a type of dense mud, but naturally, today they are mostly constructed of limestone and some are made with marble. There are three classes of Greek architecture which are Classical, Hellenistic, and Roman, but the main styles are Ionic and Doric. The Doric style was most popular in the larger part of Greece and it spilled over into Italy and it is considered the more formal out of the two. The Ionic style, on the other hand was meant to be more decorative and relaxed. One of the most iconic examples of Greek architecture would be the Pantheon, known all over the world and beautiful in its complexity.

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Roman architecture is considered to be the more advanced of the two in both areas of design and engineering. This style focuses largely on columns. The Romans share the Doric and Ionic styles with the Greeks, but they also implement Corinthian styled columns in their work. This type is considered to be more detailed and superior in style and elegance. Roman architecture is also known for the use of arches, which in their day were baffling to most people. The mystery of how they provided support without caving in was intriguing. The use of these arches lead to the development of the dome. Sticking with iconic examples of architecture, the Roman Coliseum is one of the best for Roman architecture. It shows the Romans’ work at its very best. Both of these types of architecture feed off of one another and they were the product of exceptional engineering and building techniques for their age and each still have an air of mystery surrounding them.

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