How does a manager learn to manager workplace ethical behavior? Is it from examples that managers become better at managing ethics in the workplace? I think that would be a hard lesson learned. If you have read the headlines lately, you will find that there are strong arguments for more ethical corporate leadership and to incorporate ethics into the work environment. But, what is missing is the how to in putting ethical goals into practical action. Why is this so

Q1 Class, based on what we know from the Griffin text, is everyone considered a manager?

Why, or why not?
Q2
Okay Class time to get started. There isn t a magic formula for good management, of course not. I am sure we have all had a manager that we would not like to become. But, if you re a manager perhaps the following tips I have listed will help you become more effective. There are many approaches a manager should keep in mind. I would like you to share yours, add to the list.

1. Choose a field thoughtfully.

Make it one you enjoy. It s hard to be productive without genuine enthusiasm. This is true whether you re a manager or employee. I think you must find your passion . That makes going to work a whole lot easier.

2. Hire carefully and be willing to fire.

This is tuff, but if you hire correctly the first time, the later will not be a problem. You need a strong team, because a mediocre team gives mediocre results, no matter how well managed it is. We will talk about the Peter Principle later. I have a neat web site for you to visit.

3. Create a productive environment.

This is a particular challenge because it requires different approaches depending on the context. Sometimes you maximize productivity by giving everybody his or her own office. Sometimes you achieve it by moving everybody into open space. Sometimes you use financial incentives to stimulate productivity. (All companies measure their bottom line) A combination of approaches is usually required.

4. Define success.

It is not the same to every one. So make sure everyone is on the same page as you. Make it clear to your employees what constitutes success and how they should measure their achievements. Goals must be realistic. This makes your job to do performance appraisals so much easier. So doing it right the first time save time.

5. You have to like people and be good at communicating.

This is hard to fake. If you don t genuinely enjoy interacting with people, it ll be hard to manage them well. You must have a wide range of personal contacts within your organization. Diversity comes to mind here.

6. Develop your people to do their jobs better than you can.

People like to succeed. They like to learn. Why are you here? Transfer your skills to them. This is an exciting goal but it can be threatening to a manager who worries that he s training his replacement.

7. Build morale.

Especially in today s economic work conditions. Make it clear there s plenty of good will to go around and that it s not just you as some hotshot manager who s going to impress others if things go well. Give people a sense of the importance of what they re working on**its importance to the company, its importance to customers. When you achieve great results, everybody involved should share in the credit and feel good about it.

8. Take on projects yourself.

We will talk about Sir Shackleton later. Roll up your shirt sleeves and dig right in. You need to do more than communicate. The last thing people want is a boss who just doles out stuff. From time to time prove you can be hands on by taking on one of the less attractive tasks and using it as an example of how your employees should meet challenges.

9. Don t make the same decision twice.

Spend the time and thought to make a solid decision the first time so that you don t revisit the issue unnecessarily. If you re too willing to reopen issues, it interferes not only with your execution but also with your motivation to make a decision in the first place.

10. Let people know whom to please.

Share the chain of command or your company s organization structure. Maybe it s you, maybe it s your boss and maybe it s somebody who works for you. You re in trouble**and risking**breakdown in your department, when employees start saying to themselves: Am I supposed to be making this person happy or this other person happy? They seem to have different priorities. Keep everyone in tune with what is going on and what is expected of them. It in the long run will make your job easier.
Q3
There is a great deal of pressure on CEOs in recent years to use moral criteria in making decisions. Some observers are concerned that too much emphasis on ethics will lead to less aggressive and competitive behavior, which may adversely affect profitability.

Do you agree or disagree? Please use external research via the DeVry University Library to support your answer.

Q4 Particularly today when it is tough to understand and managing highly diverse values in the workplace?

How does a manager learn to manager workplace ethical behavior? Is it from examples that managers become better at managing ethics in the workplace? I think that would be a hard lesson learned. If you have read the headlines lately, you will find that there are strong arguments for more ethical corporate leadership and to incorporate ethics into the work environment. But, what is missing is the how to in putting ethical goals into practical action. Why is this so

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