The most common process for making the influenza vaccine was developed in the 1940s. Jonas Salk is one of the co-inventors of the influenza vaccine also developed the polio vaccine.

The most common process for making the influenza vaccine was developed in the

1940s. Jonas Salk is one of the co-inventors of the influenza vaccine also developed

the polio vaccine.

The World Health Organization coordinates the process for making the influenza

vaccines. They begin by detecting new virus. Once the strain is identified and isolated,

it gets mixed with a standard virus through a technique called assortment. The process

of assortment is to create a hybrid virus. One the hybrid virus produces the proper

antigen response; it is then ready to be injected into the chicken eggs. The Influenza

vaccine takes about 6 months from the start to finish. In making the vaccine, it requires

approximately 1.2 billion fertilized chicken eggs. Those 1.2 billion eggs will make

approximately 3 billion doses of the vaccine. The virus is incubated in the eggs for 2 to 3

days, and then it is separated from the eggs.

New vaccines are produced every year because the virus is always changing. No two

influenza viruses are the same. So since the viruses change, the vaccines need to

change as well.

Even though vaccines have a very high effectiveness rate, they are not completely

effective for 100% of the people who receive them.

One way vaccines play a role in preventing the spreading of a disease or virus is, that

it shield and protects our bodies against viruses. Vaccines allow our immune system to

build antibodies to fight against the disease or viruses antigen.

Vaccines have prevented approximately 6 million deaths worldwide. And also a

99% decrease in incidence for 9 diseases that vaccines have been recommended.

One effect if the communities or even individuals refuse to get the recommended

vaccines, the approximately 6 million death that were prevented, would probably double

worldwide. Another effect would be the continuous spread of the virus or disease.

And since viruses are always changing it might make it impossible to keep up with the

vaccines for all the different strains.

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